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Monday, December 11, 2017
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Negligence of water resources
There is some grim irony in the huffing and puffing over the impact of the climate change and the danger of carbon emission because we don’t pay serious attention to environmental issues until consequences are felt to be too grave to ignore attention. Major sources of fresh water for are in decline as researchers found an overall decline in the amount of water flowing into the world’s oceans. Human activities such as the building of dams and the diversion of water for agriculture have attributed largely to the reduction, though climate change was the biggest reason as rising temperatures were altering rainfall patterns and increasing rates of evaporation. Much as the need to put a cap on the growing carbon emission is expedient, it is necessary to conserve water. It is estimated that 1.3 billion persons in the world don’t have access to safe drinking water and some 2.4 billion are denied sanitation and this kills 6,000 people daily. Increasing privatisation of water services in countries like India is leading to growing disparity of access to safe water. Meanwhile, India’s supply of water is rapidly dwindling primarily due to mismanagement of water resources, although over-pumping and pollution are also significant contributors. The state has got a duty to protect ground water against excessive exploitation. It is often felt that the availability of cheap water to the agricultural sector has tended to encourage its pre-emption for a low value, high- volume use, and has encouraged its wasteful and profligate consumption. About 86 per cent of all the diseases in the country are directly or indirectly related to the poor quality of drinking water, and 70 per cent of India’s water is polluted. India will face a severe water crisis in 20 years if the government doesn’t change its ways. By 2020, India’s demand for water will exceed all sources of supply. Govt lacks proper water management system in place, while its groundwater is disappearing and river bodies are turning into makeshift sewers. India receives an average of 4,000 billion cubic meters of rainfall every year. Unfortunately, only 48 per cent of rainfall ends up in India’s rivers. Due to lack of storage, only 18 per cent can be utilised. So can we really discount our part in the crisis? Could water conservation have a chance with the new government?
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